How I celebrated Human Rights Day in South Africa

In South Africa Human Rights Day is celebrated on the 21st of March. In my country we do not celebrate the UN Human Rights Day. On Human Rights Day 21 march 1960 protesters who opposed pass laws and apartheid were attacked by the apartheid police. The police opened fire on the protest crowed and killed 69 people in Sharpeville. In Langa a separate related protest was held and 3 people were killed. Many were injured. The Pan African Congress (PAC) wanted to put an end repressive pass laws. During apartheid Black people were required to carry a pass book in order to travel around in cities. This year I spent my Human Rights Day visiting a few Iziko Museums which are free on public holidays. I went with my boyfriend, his little cousin and mom to the South African Museum, National Art Gallery and the Slave Lodge Museum. In this blog post I will share a few of the photos of the day. The first photo is one which provides a look into the past and the rest were all taken on Human Rights Day 2019.

Archbishop Tutu and the Late Prof Jakes Gerwel Rector of UWC leave St Mary’s Church, Gugulethu after addressing students 23rd August 1989
Archbishop Tutu and the Late Prof Jakes Gerwel Rector of UWC leave St Mary’s Church, Gugulethu after addressing students 23rd August 1989. This photo proves that the apartheid police used tear gas to stop political activism. Please note that whilst setting up an exhibition I found this photo and the photographer remains unknown.
The #FeesMustFall movement in South Africa
A few photos from The #FeesMustFall movement in South Africa. Fees Must Fall started in 2015 when students started protesting high increases of university tuition. Since then a number of protests on the streets and online have continued. These photos are part of an exhibit at the National Art Gallery in Cape Town.
IMG-20190324-WA0016
African hand made art sold at the Company Gardens.
Social History Museum Cape Town, South Africa
This 3D art installation is part of a new exhibit at the South African Museum located in the Company Gardens. My boyfriend isn’t looking at the camera and I’m trying to make his little cousin smile.
Slave Lodge Cape Town
Slave Lodge Cape Town exhibit which documents the names of some of the people who were enslaved in Cape Town. The names are on the cylinder. Behind on the wall the words are: “In the light of memory and remembering. Through the streams of our senses. Reconnecting. Recollecting. We find our way home”
A short explanation on why South Africa celebrates Human Rights Day at the Slave Lodge.
A short explanation on why South Africa celebrates Human Rights Day at the Slave Lodge.
A photo which is at the Slave Lodge Museum
A photo which is at the Slave Lodge Museum
Exhibit at the Slave Lodge
Exhibit at the Slave Lodge it was common for slaves to be given a surname (last name) according to the month when they were sold on auction. So if you were sold in January your surname would be January. As a Capetonian I know a few people who have months of the year as their last names.
Runaway slaves panel at the Slave Lodge
Runaway slaves panel at the Slave Lodge
Social History Museum
Social History Museum: Human Rights Day
Human Rights Day
Human Rights Day
In front of the Company Gardens of Cape Town are the opening lines of South Africa's Constitution
In front of the Company Gardens of Cape Town are the opening lines of South Africa’s Constitution
Steve Biko quote
Steve Biko quote at the Slave Lodge. Steve Biko was killed whilst imprisoned for fighting against apartheid. He was a key leader of the Black Conscious Movement which sought to have Black people lead Black liberalization movements.
A temporary Egypt exhibition is now at the Slave Lodge Museum in Cape Town
A temporary Egypt exhibition is now at the Slave Lodge Museum in Cape Town
The National Art Gallery in Cape Town
The National Art Gallery in Cape Town. The painting depicts the rising inflation and the negative aspects of Capitalism around the world.

To visit the museums and find out more on them:

http://iziko.org.za/static/page/admission-fee

https://www.iziko.org.za/museums/south-african-museum

https://www.iziko.org.za/museums/south-african-national-gallery

https://www.iziko.org.za/museums/slave-lodge

To read more about Human Rights Day:

https://www.sahistory.org.za/dated-event/human-rights-day-celebrated-first-time-south-africa

https://albertonrecord.co.za/138668/5-facts-human-rights-day-south-africa/

Thank you for supporting my blog. Feel free to comment and or contact me via inbox or email.

Happy travels!

Nikki xx

10 Comments

  1. kagould17 says:

    Great post Nikki. It is too bad so many Human Wrongs go into making a Human Rights Day. In 1984, we were on a tour of Europe with a family from South Africa. They generously invited us to come visit them in South Africa, stating that they would take us to the museums, but they could not go in. We did not understand in the age before Google that they were “coloured” and that is why they could not enter. We had only seen a beautiful family. We exchanged letters for a few years, but, regrettably, we never managed to visit. Glad to see things are getting better. Allan

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi there Allan yes it’s something that is difficult to understand even for me since I was very young when apartheid ended. I never directly experienced it but, my parents and siblings did. The apartheid government also didn’t let foreign nationals know a lot about what was going on so if Google had existed they would have tried to change the information. Sorry that you didn’t get to visit. I’m “coloured” as well which is a whole other story on itself since the race group label was created by the apartheid state. I hope you get to visit South Africa and Cape Town in particular. When you do come let me know would love to show you around a bit and have a coffee.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. tsepotheview says:

    Celebration of Human rights day is important to all south Africans, Africans and all the countries that supported RSA to achieve freedom so south Africa is among countries that has rich history so I hope you had opportunity to experience south Africa and all it’s beauty and next time when you come to RSA do make sure you visit Soweto in gauteng (Johannesburg) and you will get to exactly how freedom was achieved.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi there thanks for your comment I am actually South African based in Cape Town my home city. I have been to Johannesburg but I didn’t get to see most of the city. it’s definitely on my to do list. Especially since my boyfriend is from Soweto. Right now I’m a intern so I can’t travel limited to Cape Town. But when I do go to Soweto I will post about the experience.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. tsepotheview says:

        You do so dear friend… It is nice to now and then read South African blog because you get to read about issues that affect you directly for example if I write about state capture or EFF rallies you know exactly how they directly or indirectly affect you.

        Like

        1. Exactly most of my readers are from the US so it’s great to connect with a fellow South African.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. ChecheWinnie says:

    Great post, and it’s a good thing that things are different now.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks you so much

      Liked by 1 person

  4. As a South African who really wants to learn more about her culture, I appreciate this post more than words can describe. Thank you. ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much. Your comment is so kind😃

      Like

Comments are closed.